What is the
Rotterdam CCUS
Porthos project?

The Netherlands has set itself clear climate targets: by 2030, it plans to have reduced its greenhouse emissions by 49% compared to 1990 levels, and 95% by 2050. One measure that the Dutch industry can take to achieve these climate objectives is Carbon Capture Usage and Storage (or CCUS for short). In CCUS, CO₂ is captured at the source and reused or stored underground. The important role played by CCUS in the energy transition is confirmed both in the Third Rutte cabinet’s coalition agreement and the main outlines of the upcoming Climate Agreement.

That’s why the Port of Rotterdam, Gasunie and EBN are jointly preparing a new project in which CO₂ generated by industry in Rotterdam’s port area is captured and stored in empty gas fields deep in the North Sea seabed. A share of the CO₂ can also be sourced to the greenhouses of the province of South Holland, where it will be used to speed up plant growth.

The three companies have joined strengths under the project banner Porthos: Port of Rotterdam CO₂ Transport Hub & Offshore Storage.

 

See project

Refineries and chemical plants capture CO2 generated during their production processes. This CO2 is fed into the public collection network via a pipeline.

The CO2 is transported to the compressor station via a public pipeline. A share of the CO2 is forwarded to horticulture and greenhouses in the Westland area.

A share of the captured CO2 is used for greenhouse farming. The CO2 is used to speed up plants’ growth.

At the compressor station, the CO2 is pressurised and transported via a pipeline to an empty gas field
in the North Sea seabed. The CO2 is stored here at a depth of approximately 3 km.

How will CCUS be utilised
in Rotterdam?

  • 1Capture of CO2
  • 2Transport via the pipeline
  • 3Use of CO2
  • 4Storage of CO2

How will CCUS be utilised
in Rotterdam?

Refineries and chemical plants capture CO2 generated during their production processes. This CO2 is fed into the public collection network via a pipeline.

The CO2 is transported to the compressor station via a public pipeline. A share of the CO2 is forwarded to horticulture and greenhouses in the Westland area.

A share of the captured CO2 is used for greenhouse farming. The CO2 is used to speed up plants’ growth.

At the compressor station, the CO2 is pressurised and transported via a pipeline to an empty gas field
in the North Sea seabed. The CO2 is stored here at a depth of approximately 3 km.

Rotterdam CCUS is an initiative of

The three public shareholdings Port of Rotterdam, Gasunie and EBN all play an important role in the Dutch energy landscape. Besides helping to reduce the Netherlands’ CO₂ emissions, these organisations also aim to play an active role in the energy transition.

The three will be working together in this CCUS project, with each party contributing its specific experience and expertise. The Port of Rotterdam Authority will be focusing on the local situation and market, EBN will be sharing its expertise in the area of deeper soil layers and offshore infrastructure, and Gasunie can offer extensive experience with gas infrastructure development and gas transport.

For more information about the partners:

Frequently asked questions

Why is there a public invitation to companies to submit an Expression of Interest?

The Porthos project is being developed as a generally accessible transport and storage infrastructure into which multiple parties can supply CO2. Each company has the opportunity to register to supply CO2 to the system, and all companies will be treated equally. These are the reasons for the public invitation to companies. The process also enables companies to make their requirements known. This information can be used to optimise the system.

What is an Expression of Interest?

In an Expression of Interest companies indicate their concrete interest in supplying CO2 to Porthos for storage beneath the North Sea or for use in greenhouses. The companies give an indication of how much CO2 this concerns and when they would like and are able to supply this.

In which respect is this project different from previous CO​2 capture and storage initiatives?

The point of departure for the Rotterdam CCUS project Porthos is a public collector pipeline for CO2: a robust basis infrastructure, in other words. Companies that want to dispose of their CO2 can connect to this network. Today, but also years from now. This open basic infrastructure concept yields substantial cost advantages compared to independent, single-user projects. A share of the captured CO2 will be used by local greenhouses, while the main share will be transported via a pipeline to an empty gas field some 25 km off the Dutch coast, in the North Sea. Here, the CO2 will be pumped down to depleted gas reservoirs deep under the seabed that are surrounded by impermeable layers. In contrast with the ROAD project, Porthos focuses on industrial activities that have few sustainable alternatives to turn to at this point in time – oil refining and chemical production, for example. By storing CO2 in the North Sea seabed, we expect to alleviate the immediate concerns for the built-up environment.

Which gas field will the CO​2​ be stored in? And who owns this field?

There are a number of different fields off the Dutch coast. We are currently talking with TAQA to determine whether its P18 site in the North Sea could serve as a storage location. This would be a logical choice since the TAQA fields are closest to Maasvlakte.

Where will you be realising the CO​2​ pipeline?

Right now, we are examining two possible routes for the pipeline. The most logical option would be to follow the existing pipeline corridor next to the A15 between Vondelingenplaat (Pernis) and Maasvlakte. From there, the pipeline could be laid under the North Sea seabed to an empty gas field some 25 km off the coast. Which route is decided on depends on a number of factors, including the various technical options, the site of the compressor substation, the costs and environmental impact. The latter aspect will be studied in the project’s Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA).